No Added Seizure Risk from Antidepressant Use in Pregnancy

Pregnant with ultrasound image
Source: Pixabay

A large Swedish study in the journal Neurology found that pregnant women taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) during the first trimester of was not linked to an increased risk for neonatal seizures and epilepsy in childhood.

Any increase in seizures or epilepsy is likely due to other factors, the researchers said.

“It’s not likely the medications themselves that are causing the seizures and epilepsy in children, but rather the reasons why these women are taking the medication,” according to Kelsey Kathleen Wiggs, a PhD candidate at Indiana University in Bloomington. There are also the other background factors that differ between women who do and do not use SSRI/SNRIs.

“When it rains, it pours,” Wiggs said. “Women who are taking antidepressants in pregnancy are doing that for lots of different reasons, and they might be at risk for different things than women who aren’t taking those medications in pregnancy.”

An elevated risk for neonatal seizures (risk ratio [RR] 1.41) and epilepsy in early childhood (HR 1.21) among offspring of mothers who used antidepressants in pregnancy.

Adjustment for maternal indications for SSRI/SNRI use and background factors like smoking during pregnancy revealed that they were drivers for both associations: neonatal seizures (RR 1.10); epilepsy diagnosis at 5 years (HR 0.96). Parental history of epilepsy was not found to affect the association.

The findings provide a “conclusive answer” to these concerns with using SSRI/SNRIs during pregnancy, according to Anne Berg, PhD, and Torin Glass, BM, Bch, BAO.

“[SSRI/SNRIs] have been demonstrated to have serotonergic central nervous system effects and are associated with an observable withdrawal syndrome which may be seen in the neonate following in utero exposure,” noted Drs Berg and Glass, in an accompanying editorial.

“The authors understood that with a population-based data registry and huge sample size, they had more than sufficient statistical power to detect even a modest increase in risk,” the editorialists wrote. “They tested this hypothesis and were able to reject it, definitively!”

In order to determine whether antidepressants had a causal association with infant seizures and childhood epilepsy, the researchers analysed data from national Swedish healthcare registries on a total of 1 721 274 children in Sweden born between 1996 and 2011.

Participants were divided into two groups: one group of mothers who reported use of an SSRI (fluoxetine, citalopram, paroxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, escitalopram) or SNRI (venlafaxine, duloxetine) during the first trimester of pregnancy (n = 24 308), and another group with no reported antidepressant use (n = 1 696 966).

Source: MedPage Today

Leave a Reply